Blended Learning: New Approaches Enhance Classroom Instruction

With the ongoing state of political unrest, the University is undertaking a number of flexible instruction techniques to keep up with any interruptions to the teaching process. These blended learning measures include the integration of Panopto (lecture-capture technology), the use of Web 2.0 applications such as wikis and blogs, as well as utilizing Blackboard and Blackboard Collaborate, which enhance online learning and communication.

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Marine Enthusiast Ahmad Sonbol Leaves Lasting Memory

Ahmad Sonbol, a 24-year-old teaching assistant (TA) at the Department of Biology who died during the dispersal of the Rabaa protests, is remembered by his colleagues and friends for his endless energy and love of science, particularly marine biology.

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11 Days Left to Submit Ideas for AUC's New Mascot

Submit your ideas for the mascot mania competition.

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Students Use TV to Educate, Raise Social Awareness

A recent study by the World Health Organization found that the rate of domestic violence worldwide was the highest in the Middle East and Africa, with 37 percent of women reporting physical abuse at the hands of their partners. Three AUC graduate students produced public service announcements (PSAs) to educate Egyptians about domestic violence in order to raise awareness about the issue, which they found was not adequately addressed in local media.

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Anderson Emphasizes Openness, Optimism in Community Forum

In a room filled with faculty, staff and students, President Lisa Anderson led a community forum on September 3, which addressed the University’s adaptation to Egypt’s political climate and the importance of maintaining a welcoming atmosphere at AUC.

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Galal Amin Receives State Appreciation Award

In 1947, Ahmed Amin, father of Professor Emeritus Galal Amin, was awarded the inaugural King Fuad Prize for Literature. More than six decades later, Amin followed in his footsteps to receive the prize, now called the State Appreciation Award in Social Sciences. This prestigious award is presented by the Supreme Council of Cultural Affairs to distinguished social scientists.

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Psychological Research Shows "Othering" to Deepen Social Divide

“The hate rhetoric on the national scene makes reconciliation seem like a far-fetched dream,” said Mona Amer, associate professor of psychology. “There is little focus on creating a culture of healing and minimal interest in building bridges. Governmental and political groups seem to be neither listening nor compromising. This mirrors what the average person on the street does.”

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The Body as a Site as Contest

Sherene Seikaly, director of Middle East Studies Center, talks about how the body becomes a site of contest between revolutionaries and the State.

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A New Take on Old Water

AUC's Adham Ramadan, Amal Esawi and their students develop a cost effective and more efficient hybrid membrane for water desalination plants using carbon nanotubes.

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Dahawy Outlines Vision for Student Affairs

Walking through Khaled Dahawy’s door, one is quickly greeted with an inviting smile and a firm, reassuring handclasp. For Dahawy, his recent appointment as vice president for student affairs was made all the more appealing by the fact that he never applied for it. “I was surprised to find my name on the nominations list,” he said. “But this only solidified my connection with the job. The community is putting its trust in me, and I want to make sure that they don’t feel let down.”

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Mark Mineart: Theatre Not Just Art, but Public Service

Drama is considered an art form throughout the world, on par with visual arts, music, dance and literature. At AUC, theatre courses are housed in the Department of the Arts, a categorization that aligns with this interpretation. But theatre’s roots are not artistic. In civilizations across the globe, theatre originated in ceremonies that were typically religious or sacred in nature. As societies grew more complex, their theatrical or performative traditions began to take place under less ‘sacred’ circumstances. However, theatre remained a pedantic exercise.

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Intellectual Property Debate

In the music industry in Egypt, sales from CD and cassette tapes are now of secondary importance to musicians, who are making most of their profits from live concerts, contended Nagla Rizk, director of AUC’s Access to Knowledge for Development Center and professor of economics. In the meantime, domestic music piracy rates have spiraled at 60 percent, and Internet downloads have become prevalent.

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Reviving Arabic Script Helps Create New Arab Visual Identity

In spite of a rich artistic history, Arabic script has had difficulty transitioning into a digital format for use in graphic design. Currently, there are around 500 Arabic fonts, compared to more than 72,000 fonts and counting in Latin script.

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Deep Sea DNA Unlocks New Enzymes with Vast Applications

It is 4 am, and research vessel RV/Aegeo has set sail into uncharted territory. For the 60 experts who are occupying the boat, rising at an unearthly hour is not a deterrent. Long before then, the vessel has been bustling with activity, with crew members skillfully navigating the waterways and biologists clustering around lab equipment. As the RV/Aegeo approaches its intended destination, monitors begin to beep, signaling the deployment of samplers into the deep and enigmatic waters of the Red Sea.

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Student Voices: Hussein Seif El Nasr

Seif El-Nasr, a political science senior, reflects on his acting experience at AUC and how it made a lasting impact on him

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