Spring 2017 Institutes and Workshops

Thursday January 26, and repeated Sunday, January 29, Tuesday February 7, Tuesday March 14, Sunday March 26 and Thursday April 20, 2017

9:30–11:00 am The Enhanced Lecture 
Aziza ِEllozy

Some of us would argue that lecturing is still the most prevalent way of teaching at AUC and at most universities. However, numerous research findings have shown that listening to a lecture is not the best way to promote deep and lasting learning, and that students typically lose attention after 20 minutes. For faculty members who are more comfortable lecturing and who think that this is the best approach to fulfill their course objectives, this workshop will introduce low-risk, high-impact active learning strategies that will minimize the weaknesses of the lecture and have been found to increase student engagement and learning.

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11:00 am–12:15 pm  Technology to Support Good Practice in Undergraduate Education Hoda Mostafa and Maha Bali

Many faculty members are familiar with Chickering and Gamson's Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. This workshop explores possible ways of integrating technology into our teaching to better enable us to achieve good practices, including ways of enhancing communication, encouraging active and cooperative learning, providing timely feedback and addressing diverse ways of learning.

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12:15–12:45 pm        Lunch 

12:45–2:15 pm   CATs to Improve Student Learning 
Aziza  Ellozy and Caroline Mitry

Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) are simple techniques that provide feedback on how well students are learning, which faculty members can collect and act upon. In this workshop, we will discuss the benefits and challenges of using CATs, introduce a few simple CATs and discuss the merits of each in light of particular teaching goals. Participants will also take the Teaching Goals Inventory (TGI) using a course they are presently teaching, and based on the results of the TGI, they will identify the assessment technique(s) that could address the specific goals they wish to accomplish in class. Faculty are asked to bring their own device/laptop.

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2:15–3:30 pm             Understanding by Design (UbD)

Azza Awwad and Fady Morcos

In this workshop, participants will explore some basic ideas in student-centered course design, employing the framework of backward design, with a focus on the alignment of basic course elements.

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Sunday February 12, 2017

9:30–10:45 am  Beginnings and Endings: Every Minute Counts

Hoda Mostafa and Maha Bali

How we start our class can set the tone for the rest of the session, and how we end our class can affect how students retain learning, interact with peers and engage with the instructor. This workshop focuses on creating an environment that promotes effective learning and wraps up key learning moments. Participants will learn about how to start and end class with teacher-tested icebreakers, focusing activities, team-building strategies and formative assessments that enhance learning experiences. Participants will construct a sample lesson utilizing some of the techniques in the workshop.

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11:00 am–12:15 pm  Structured Academic Controversy: Debating for Consensus 

A. Ellozy and A. Awwad

Students typically arrive to AUC believing that issues have a right/wrong answer and have difficulty dealing with shades of gray. They feel uncomfortable when confronted with ideas or perspectives that challenge their cherished beliefs. Ensuing conflicts/disagreements in classroom discussions can be important catalysts in preparing our students to become critical citizens. Structured Academic Controversy (SAC) is a cooperative learning strategy that is designed to engage students in controversy and then guides them via structured discussion to seek consensus and synthesize novel solutions. This workshop will introduce participants to this pedagogical approach and to its different stages. Participants will engage in a SAC simulation and explore the various ways this strategy can be adopted in different classroom settings.

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12:15–12:45 pm         Lunch

12:45–2:00 pm           Concept Mapping Across the Disciplines

Aziza Ellozy and Hoda  Mostafa

Visually representing knowledge can be one of the most effective ways of constructing knowledge and developing critical reading and thinking skills. This workshop introduces participants to concept mapping and mind mapping, two powerful visual learning tools that can be used in any discipline for learning and/or assessment. Participants will learn the basic principles of concept mapping and mind mapping as well as the kind of activities these techniques could be used for. Examples from language learning, writing, sciences and engineering will be shared and participants will explore how to best introduce concept mapping as a learning and teaching tool into their respective courses.

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2:15–3:30 pm             Cooperative Learning

Fady Morcos and Sherif Osman

Group work sometimes seems like a good idea when planning lessons; it feels natural and gives the students a chance to interact. In reality, many problems arise from grouping the students, designing the activities, and assessing group activities. This workshop will aim to clarify the move from group activities to cooperative learning, explaining the basic principles, which, when implemented well, can overcome many of the problems of group-based work, and provide benefits of social learning and increased interactivity. This workshop will be delivered in a cooperative learning fashion and will aim to guide the initial implementation of this pedagogy in the classroom, also showcasing some successful case studies at AUC.

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Assessment for Learning Track Institute

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

 

9:30–10:45 am           Student-Generated Exams  Fady Michel and Sherif Osman

One of the effective ways to promote content engagement, and assess students’ comprehension of course material, is to have them generate test questions with model answers. Student-generated questions for examination allow faculty to assess what their students consider the most important or memorable content, what they understand as fair and useful test questions, and how well they can answer the questions they have posed. This information not only provides direction for teaching, but can also stimulate deeper learning and reduce student test anxiety. The workshop will focus on different applications and techniques of this practice, followed by examples of small-scale case studies of student-generated exams at AUC.

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11:00–12:15 pm         Are My Assessments Really Promoting Learning? Maha Bali and  Azza Awwad

“No system of academic assessment is intrinsically good, only good for a purpose. That purpose must be established first.” - Kris Shaffer This workshop invites participants to consider ways to enhance the learning value of assessments, in order to ensure assessments achieve their purpose. We will explore elements such as intrinsic motivation, feedback, pacing, approaches to grading, attitudes towards failure and space for student choice/relevance.

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12:15–12:45 pm         Lunch

12:45–2:00 pm            Engaging Learners with Digital Narratives and Multi-modal Projects 

                                       Aziza Ellozy and Hoda Mostafa

For learners to thrive in a digital world, they need a set of 21st century skills, which include visual and information literacy skills as well as technological literacy skills. A digital narrative assignment is one that uses visual media to help students cultivate some of these skills. This workshop focuses on the use of digital narratives as a way of engaging students with science and other disciplines and helping them appreciate the complex process of constructing knowledge. Through the process of researching the topic, outlining the narrative, writing a storyboard, selecting appropriate images and creating a movie, students develop a diverse set of skills: effective communication, peer collaboration, critical thinking, visual literacy and technological efficiency.

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2:15–3:30 pm             E-portfolios: Documenting Achievements and Reflecting on Learning

                                       Carol Clark (ALA), Mariah Fairley and Heba Fathelbab

One of the ways educators and students in the 21st century can both document learning and reflect on its value is through the use of e-portfolios. This workshop will show how the presenters used e-portfolios in core curriculum courses in Rhetoric and Composition 2015-16 and how students responded to the experience in a survey administered at the end of the fall and spring semesters. One or more portfolios will be shown, followed by a question-answer session with students. After the elements and benefits of e-portfolios are explained, rubrics for assessing the portfolios and lessons learned will be discussed. Finally, the e-portfolio Google site template and other resources will be made available for participants.

 

Community Based Learning Track Institute

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Note: Click on workshop title for description

9:30–10:45 am           The Principles of Community-Based Learning Amani Elshimi

This workshop highlights the definitions, guiding principles and benefits of CBL pedagogies. It offers an overview of different teaching models involving CBL and, engages participants in discussion on preparation and management. Different examples of CBL classes in different disciplines are shared.

 

10:45 am–12:00 pm  Assessment of a Community-Based Learning Activity Pandeli  Glavanis

CBL assessment of student output may be facilitated by reflective frameworks that inform and integrate the process. This workshop introduces selected tools and models for both formative and summative CBL assessment. Ways in which to turn assessment into Classroom Action Research will be discussed.

12:00–12:45 pm        Lunch

12:45–2:00 pm           Step-by-Step CBL Activity Design Mona Amer, Amani Elshimi and Pandeli Glavanis

This is a hands-on workshop that gives participants practical experience in designing a CBL activity. Emphasis is placed on different ways to integrate CBL into an existing or new course, depending on learning goals, size of the class, academic preparation of the students and community partnership or project type.

2:00–3:15 pm             CBL Faculty Development: Maximizing Benefits and Minimizing Challenges

                                         Mona Amer

This is an open discussion with faculty about potential benefits and professional development opportunities for the CBL instructor. The conversation will focus on identifying best practices and tips for gaining the most benefit from the CBL experience, considering ethics, and preventing or addressing practical challenges.

Web Enhanced Teaching and Learning Track  Institute

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Note: Click on workshop title for description

9:30–10:45 am           Promoting Deep Analysis of Texts with Annotation (New)

                                     Maha Bali and Nadine Aboulmagd

Annotation has been used by readers and learners for centuries and can enhance not only the way we read texts, but also how we interact with and analyze different types of multimedia in various disciplines. In this interactive hands-on workshop, we will explore the importance and potential of annotation as a pedagogical tool. We will also introduce and discuss digital annotation as a collaborative and engaging practice that could drive students towards acquiring the skills of 21st century critical thinkers and learners. Because annotation can be done both online and offline, we will discuss the affordance of each environment and mention several digital tools for annotation, while also engaging in a digital hands-on activity.

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11:00 am–12:15 pm  Social Media in the Classroom Maha Bali and Sherif Osman

Is there value in using social media such as Twitter and Facebook in your classroom? In this workshop, we discuss our views on digital literacy and open learning, and share some approaches to using social media in ways that support student learning. We will also discuss good practices, and concerns over e-safety when using social media for learning

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12:15–12:45 pm         Lunch

12:45–2:00 pm          Podcasting in the Classroom (New) Hoda Mostafa, Kim Fox and Nadine Abouldmagd

Podcasts are digital or audio files that can be streamed or downloaded from a website or podcast provider to a portable device. The use of podcasts in education has increased dramatically in recent years with the rise in popular demand and consumption of podcasts for entertainment and educational purposes. Storytelling has been one of the main vehicles of relaying information to the masses, keeping oral histories and transferring crucial messages. Podcasts can be engaging and content driven, often with a theme or story to be told. Participants in this workshop will explore a variety of theme-based podcasts that can easily be integrated into a variety of courses and disciplines. Participants will learn about the facilitators’ experiences in creating podcasts with their students and using podcasts as anchors and learning prompts for class activities and assignments.

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2:15–3:30 pm             Blogs and Wikis Gihan Osman

In an attempt to engage Net Generation students, educators are increasingly integrating online components into their courses. Among the tools used are Web 2.0 technologies such as Wikipedia, blogs, RSS feeds, and virtual environments. Unlike previous web-based tools, Web 2.0 not only has unique capabilities that impact how we use and share information, but more importantly, how we create knowledge. As such, Web 2.0 technologies hold the potential of transforming the college classroom as well as expanding students’ learning capacity and repertoire of skills to match the requirements of the 21st century. This workshop will help you answer the following questions: (1) What is Web 2.0 technology? (2) What are its distinctive features? (3) How does it align with how people learn? (4) Why should I consider using Web 2.0 technologies in my classroom? (5) How can I use it as a transformative tool rather than a catchy prop? Attendees are expected to leave the workshop with concrete ideas of how to incorporate Web 2.0 technologies in their teaching. This workshop will focus on wikis and blogs as examples for Web 2.0

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Course Design Track Institute

Monday, April 24, 2017

Note: Click on workshop title for description

9:30 am–10:45 pm    Designing Student-Centered Learning Outcomes Aziza Ellozy and Caroline Mitry

Clear articulation of learning outcomes (LOs) and instructional objectives is key to successful teaching. Los (what instructors expect their students to know, understand, do and/or value after completion of the learning process) serve as guiding principles for designing appropriate assessment strategies, selecting instructional content, and planning course activities. In this hands-on workshop, participants will be introduced to a student-centered approach to structuring effective learning outcomes; and how to use these to guide the rest of the course design process.

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11:00 am–12:15 pm  Designing an Engaging Syllabus Hoda Mostafa and Maha Bali

Do faculty spend a lot of time working on their syllabi? How well do their students read it? In this workshop, we will encourage participants to explore ways of giving their syllabus a makeover in terms of content, aesthetics, medium and tone, with the purpose of presenting their course(s) in a way that promotes learning and engagement. Participants will leave this workshop with ideas on how to re-design their syllabus and get their students talking and thinking, while building excitement around embarking on the course journey.

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12:15–12:45 pm        Lunch

12:45–2:00 pm           Gamifying your Syllabus Fady Morcos and Sherif Osman

Games can be an effective tool f or integration of concepts and attitudes within a complex landscape. Integration of game mechanics and game-thinking techniques to non-game platforms has recently gained grounds in multiple domains, including teaching and education. Today's classrooms face major challenges around student motivation and engagement. Game-thinking techniques can greatly enhance student experience and boost engagement. Adding a “game layer” to a syllabus, course policies, workload, grading system, and learning material can generate products that are very engaging and influential to both the player (student) and the developer of the gamified experience. In this hands-on workshop participants will apply various gamification techniques that could promote active learning, and enhance student interest and engagement.

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2:15–3:30 pm             Storyboarding Your Course Hoda Mostafa and Sherif Osman

This workshop will introduce storyboarding as a technique to visualize course content, see connections, plan assessment and align content and learning outcomes with a bird's eye view. Participants will be required to bring along a course syllabus or module and explore conventional paper techniques and Padlet as well as other free web-based platforms that can be used for story-boarding. A follow-up hands-on workshop can be arranged with a minimum of 5 participants with CLT faculty consultants supporting instructors on experimenting with storyboarding in their course re-design.

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Stand-alone Workshops

Note: Click on workshop title for description

Thursday, February 23, 2017 

1:00–2:15 pm             The Art of Discussion Leading  Aziza ِEllozy

In this workshop, we will view and analyze excerpts from videos showing two Harvard professors (known for their teaching excellence) engaging their students in discussions, one in a small group and the other in a large lecture hall. We will discuss and contrast the strategies used in both situations. A framework for integrating critical thinking will be discussed.

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Sunday, March 5, 2017 

1:00–2:15 pm             Google Apps for Learning and Classroom Engagement F. Morcos and M. Shawki

Google for Education is a suite of digital tools designed to enhance student learning, engagement and productivity through cloud-based technology. This hands-on workshop will help participants build dynamic, 21st century learning environments for students to engage with content, peers and instructor. Whether participants are looking to enhance their course online presence, build a platform for online collaboration, facilitate out-of-class communication, monitor and facilitate content building, or solicit feedback, google apps can support their goals. In this workshop, we will explore this suite of digital tools and how they can be effectively utilized to promote in and out of class engagement.

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Thursday, March 16, 2017 

1:00–2:15 pm             Introduction to Blended Learning: It’s Not Just About Going Online Gihan Osman

An effective blended classroom is said to combine the best of traditional face-to-face teaching and online learning. However, transitioning to an effective hybrid format requires more than putting lectures online or integrating web-based components. The goal of this introductory information session is to provide some practical guidelines to blended learning redesign. It clarifies what blended learning is, describes techniques and pedagogical strategies to engage students, discusses the practical aspects of planning the transition and making decisions regarding technology and assessment, and shares possible scenarios and examples for blended course designs for different disciplines.

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  • Some of us would argue that lecturing is still the most prevalent way of teaching at AUC and at most universities. However, numerous research findings have shown that listening to a lecture is not the best way to promote deep and lasting learning, and that students typically lose attention after 20 minutes. For faculty members who are more comfortable lecturing and who think that this is the best approach to fulfill their course objectives, this workshop will introduce low-risk, high-impact active learning strategies that will minimize the weaknesses of the lecture and have been found to increase student engagement and learning.

    View the workshop presentation

  • Many faculty members are familiar with Chickering and Gamson's Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. This workshop explores possible ways of integrating technology into our teaching to better enable us to achieve good practices, including ways of enhancing communication, encouraging active and cooperative learning, providing timely feedback and addressing diverse ways of learning.

    View the workshop presentation